Roofing Masterpieces Continued

Olympiapark

Qualifying the covering of Olympiapark as a roof is not without difficultly. The building itself could easily be misinterpreted as a tent. And yet, the permanence of the structure, the innovative drainage system of the structure, and its ability to protect the inhabitants from the elements assure the covering of Olympiapark is indeed a roof. It was constructed in 1972 for the Summer Olympic Games in Munch—as the name suggests. The design was aligned with Germany’s effort for a “green Olympic Games,” which was chosen to associate Germany with democracy and optimism for the future. The design is a testament to German engineering. The roof itself is not actually solid, but instead a lightweight malleable material that is impervious to weather conditions. Moreover, you can actually walk to the top of Olympic Stadium and zip line to the bottom.

St. Peter’s Basilica

Located in Vatican City, St. Peter’s Basilica stands tall as a testament to ingenuity and creative. It was designed by the great Michelangelo, and is renowned as a crown jewel of Renaissance architecture, and is still one of the largest churches in the world. St. Peter’s Basilica’s central axis is the dome. The dome offers a balanced support and roof requiring no maintenance—rain water simply pelts dust and grime off the dome. The dome is the highest point in Rome, and can be seen from almost any location in the city. St. Peter’s Basilica is the burial of the great St. Peter.

U.S. Capitol Building

Last but not least is the United States Capitol, in Washington, D.C. The central point of this building is its dome, which functions almost like a crown. Thomas Jefferson proposed a design competition for the capitol and the president’s house. Jefferson chose Edward Thorton’s blue print, for its simplistic design and adherence to the classical architectural style of the Romans.